Is the Texas Wealth Club a Scam? [Updated 23 March]


Hi,

I am sending this to all the defense attorneys in the Houston area. Do you know who David [rest of name redacted] on Main Street is?

Well, I made this short video to show you why a lot of people in town think David [redacted] is the #1 defense attorney in Houston.

Here is the video: [link]

If you are thinking, why should I care who they are, here is why; according to Google there are over 12,000 people each month in Houston are looking for a defense attorney, and they are the 1st company people see.

According to Google over 40% of all of the clicks go to them, because their site; [website redacted]  is in the #1 spot.

If you still don't understand how that effects you just watch the video, it is only a few minutes long, you won't regret it.

Thanks,
Brett Borah
281.241.1196 Cell
713.636.5317 Office
[email protected]

I am not wasting a few minutes of my life watching your video (if a reader wants to watch it and report back, I'll send him or her the link). But yes, Brett. I know who David is.

The question is: does David know who you are?

I wonder if David knows that you're using his name to hawk whatever it is you're hawking ("affiliate wealth system"—a/k/a MLM pyramid scheme—perhaps?). Times are tough for lots of criminal-defense lawyers, but I highly doubt that David has signed on to your Texas-Wealth-Club scam. (Rule of thumb: When you have to flood the internet with fake "reviews" asking if your scheme is a scam (and, of course, answering in the negative), it's a scam.)

I think I'll ask him…

[a couple of hours pass]

Okay, Brett Borah. I've asked him. Guess what: he has never heard of you.

Rule of thumb: When you use the success of some guy who has never even heard of you to promote your scheme, it's a scam.

Brett, you've spent a lot of time on the internet trying to convince people that the Texas Wealth Club is not a scam, so I suspect that that is what you are trying to sell here. So I'm going to ask the same question: Is the Texas Wealth Club a scam?

All signs point to "yes."

[Update: Upon inquiry by Cindy Henley, Brett Borah responded:

Hi Cynthia,

Where did  the "Is the Texas Wealth Club a Scam?" come from? That was not in my email at all, in fact I have no idea what that means.

 All I did in the email and video was say that David Breston is considered the #1 criminal defense attorney in Houston by Google because of his effective website promotion, and that I offer similar services. If David, or anyone finds that insulting I apologize; this was never my intention and this marketing piece has never seemed to insult anyone before. I have a call into David and I will tell him that as well when he returns the call.

My uncle who has my same name received a threatening email from someone in San Diego about this late last night. In any case I removed the video because if anyone found my marketing video or email offensive that disturbs me and was not it's purpose at all.

Best regards,

Brett Borah

So Brett's email that brought him to my attention had nothing to do with the Texas Wealth Club, except that Brett is deliberately using someone else's work to advertise the work that he wants you to think he does, which I think reinforces my point.]


3 responses to “Is the Texas Wealth Club a Scam? [Updated 23 March]”

  1. At least under California law, that would be a misappropriation of David’s identify for Brett Borah’s personal financial benefit. Perhaps some Texas attorney with spare time should offer to represent David pro bono to cockroach-stomp the contemptible Borah.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.